Transmission of schistosomes

I am a PhD candidate in the Population Biology, Ecology, and Evolution program at Emory University. From a young age I knew I wanted to be a veterinarian, and so I pursued a DVM at Cornell University directly after my undergraduate degree. However, during vet school, I had my first experience with basic science research and I knew I wanted to combine these two arenas into one career, with a focus on infectious diseases. Therefore, after graduating and completing a competitive equine internship, I returned to academia to pursue my PhD.

Livestock and Maternal Health in Ethiopia

Inception of a project on Livestock and Maternal Health in Ethiopia

“Tukul” (traditional house) in Butajira area with mother and children. The livestock is kept inside, where people also cook and sleep
“Tukul” (traditional house) in Butajira area with mother and children. The livestock is kept inside, where people also cook and sleep

I first visited Ethiopia— the country with “13 months of sunshine” (beware that some heavy rains do come across a number of them!) and the largest cattle population in Africa (crucial fact for a vet!)— 10 years ago and I had a firm intention of coming back. Years later, the HORN project (One Health Regional Network for the Horn of Africa) gave me the incredible opportunity to do so. HORN’s aim is to develop a network of researchers and organisations across the Horn of Africa with the view to undertake high quality research into the underlying relationship between people’s health and wellbeing and that of livestock and the environment. I am now a HORN postdoc associated to the University of Liverpool as well as a visiting scientist at ILRI.

Exploring Bhutanese Livestock & Livelihoods to achieve Sustainable Systems

Hello reader, Greetings from down under!

My name is Juan Pablo, and I am a research fellow in One Health at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity in Victoria, Australia. In this blog post, I will tell you a bit of my (short) academic trajectory and about BLLiSS – Exploring Bhutanese Livestock & Livelihoods to achieve Sustainable Systems – the project I will run as a Soulsby fellow.

Soulsby Fellowships awarded for One Health projects on zoonotic diseases, sustainable food production and food poverty

The 2020 Soulsby Fellows

Soulsby Fellowships awarded for One Health projects on zoonotic diseases, sustainable food production and food poverty 

Covid pandemic highlights the importance of research that spans human, animal and environmental health. 

Researchers working across the wide range of One Health issues have been awarded fellowship funds to allow them to progress their research. 

New funding for Soulsby Foundation

The Soulsby Foundation has recently been awarded a grant by the Alborada Trust (http://www.alboradatrust.com/) of £25,000 each year for the next five years (2020-24). The Trustees plan to match this funding each year which will allow the Foundation to distribute around £50,000 on Fellowships each year.

The Foundation has received 26 applications for the 2020 Fellowships, a significant increase on last year, so this additional funding is most welcome.

The successful Fellows will be announced in June at the World One Health Congress in Edinburgh.

Diagnosis and eradication of PPRV in Tanzania

2018 Soulsby Fellow, Dr Camilla Benfield, shows the value of her Fellowship for the diagnosis and eradication of PPRV in Tanzania.

Professor Satya Parida, Dr Mana Mahapatra and Dr Camilla Benfield of The Pirbright Institute and The Royal Veterinary College were at Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance.

Video credits: Mpoli Pictures